Book Review: Undying by Valerie Grosjean

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Yay!!  A zombie romance!!!  I have been on a zombie kick lately, brought on by The Walking Dead and Halloween.  So I naturally gravitated to this book.  The author kindly gifted me a kindle copy, Undying.

Here is the synopsis:

This is a story of love . . . and zombies.

When eighteen-year-old college freshman Christian discovers his dormitory is crawling with the living dead, he knows he has a problem. But once he learns the whole country is overrun by the flesh-eating horde, he must race to protect what matters to him most.

Sixteen-year-old Iris, the girl he loves, is stranded eighty miles away, alone and completely unaware of the gruesome threat surrounding her.

Christian’s plan is to evade the zombies, drive the distance to rescue Iris, and get them both to his family farm–where there are guns, fuel, and everything else they’ll need to survive. His mission seems simple: Get the girl, get to the farm, and stay alive.

Things get complicated when Christian is forced to make an unthinkable choice between Iris and his family. Someone he loves must die, and he must decide.

If you have read this blog before, you know that I love zombies.  I credit my bonus child, Christian, with getting me started when he made us watch the first season of The Walking Dead a few summers ago.  I didn’t start getting into reading zombie stories until last year with the Zombie Bible series.  I have since devoured most zombie books that I can get my hands on, including the mainstream ones.

This book was a bit different.  It was a zombie story with a romantic theme.  Plenty of the zombie stories I read feature love stories as a side plot, but this book has that plotline front and center.  And I loved it.

Christian has never revealed his feeling for Iris.  He just kind of shoved them down.  He is planning on telling her when he goes home for the weekend, but then the zombie apocalypse happens.

The love story kind of mimics my own (second) marriage.  My husband and I were the same age as Christian and Iris.  We had feelings for each other, but we didn’t want to do the long distance thing.  Then life happened, and we were unable to tell each other our true feelings until we were damn near 30.  So I identify readily with the love theme.

The zombies are typical zombies.  The vector of transmission is plausible.  People “turn” very quickly, so the apocalypse happens overnight, rather than over a few days or weeks.  This definitely lends a sense of panic to the story.

The gore is typical zombie gore, but it doesn’t go overboard in the description of the mutilations.  It isn’t stomach turning.

I love the character of Christian.  He is amazing.  He is strong, capable and sensitive.  He knows what needs to be done and makes the hard decisions.  He’s a great leader.

I don’t know enough about Iris to make the same conclusions.  But if Christian loves her, she must be special.

The action is intense. It is a page turner.  There aren’t any parts that lag or don’t make sense.  The author also knows where to stop the minute by minute recall of events and let the plot flow.  Very much appreciated.

I can also tell that the author is a bit spiritual.  That is implied with Christian’s mention of heaven, his overall demeanor.  But it isn’t the focus of the story and it isn’t rammed down the reader’s throat.  In fact, it makes Christian more appealing.

I will be eagerly awaiting the next book in the series.  I truly enjoyed this read and I finished it in one night.  Valerie Grosjean is an excellent story-teller of both the zombie genre and the romance genre.

I also stopped by her blog and I was fascinated to read about her writing process.  That is also good reading if you are so inclined.

And this book is 99 cents on Amazon today.  You don’t have a valid excuse NOT to get it.

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Book Review: Gabe’s Plan

Gabe’s Plan by Andrew Stock (2012)

Genre: fiction, suspense, criminal justice

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cover art

A little bio about Andrew, per his Goodreads profile:

Andrew Stock is the co-screenwriter of The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard (Paramount, 2009). He has Ph.D. in Political Theory from the University of Colorado and a law degree from the University of Texas. He currently works as an attorney for a non-profit organization in North Platte, Nebraska, where he lives. Gabe’s Plan is his first novel.

*Let me preempt by saying I entered the Goodreads book give-away for Andrew’s book. He contacted me via Goodreads and offered to send me a free copy of the book if I’d be willing to write a review, which is no problem for me. I was pleasantly surprised and quite excited that an author sought me out since I’ve just embarked on this book blogging journey. However, Andrew’s kindness has no affect on the content or opinions of this review. Enjoy!

When I first saw the cover art, I was expecting a quant, heartwarming story of some fool man scheming up a romantic plan to win back his heartbroken woman…until I read the book synopsis. Holy Hera! I knew it would be a good read, with repressed lovers, mental health issues and vengeance at the core. I did feel the synopsis said a little too much, but I had a feeling Stock has some unsuspected twists up his sleeve.

Reading the first chapter, I wasn’t expecting quite the content it contained. Fair warning: this is most definitely NOT a “teen” (young adult) book. Expect derogatory, homophobic and sexual commentary like “pulling down panties and spreading”, “new swinging dick,” “fuck his drunk brains out” and blowing a wad. I feel like this is my somewhat douche-y brother talking. So if you are surprised or shocked by that type of language, you can take it in style or take offense – but I encourage you to keep reading.

“…on this painted sky morning, Gabe was certain the American people would wake up ready to send Bush back to Texas, where everything is bigger, including the size of the dipshit in its politics.”

Although the book starts off with Gabe casting his presidential election vote at his elementary school and knowing from the synopsis that he is the DA, I didn’t think there would be much of a political influence. I have to ask myself, Is this a little of the author’s barbing opinion coming out? I wasn’t sure, but I am a Texan born and bred, after all. In all seriousness, I often don’t agree with politics or politicians – no matter the party or the person. I believe in doing what is right, and what makes sense. And I have a sense of humor, and that’s how I read this part. So I’d advise taking this book with a little grain of salt if politics are not your cup of tea. Mmmm, salty tea…not so delish. Let’s make it sugar?

In all seriousness, after the flagrant political and douche bag comments, I was ready to chuck the book, but I pressed on. And then I was ready to give a very critical review of the political nature underlying the book. But…it grew on me. If you are ready to toss this book like I was, keep reading. You are indeed in for a treat.

The Main Players:

  • Gabe, an intelligent Iraqi war veteran with a limp (and the story spread all across his small hometown of Pine Springs, Colorado) is no newcomer to politics. Although he is the District Attorney, his father was the mayor of Pine Springs, and his brother is now the sheriff. Gabe has moved back into his childhood home with Mom after his father’s recent death. Unlike his sheriff brother, Gabe is pro-Kerry and hates Bush – who cost him his leg – with a passion. He often wishes his thoughts weren’t so trivial and normal, but more of Einstein quality.
  • Chad, arrogant, spoiled, 5-time big screen (and womanizing) movie star fresh to Pine Springs for some “R and R” at a whopping $15mil estate he bought (why not rent?) has his eye on local  Kaila, who just happens to be carrying the torch for someone else. Quite a challenge, Chaddie. Gabe sure has set Chad off in a fit – all because of Kaila. Let me say this: Chad is an egotistical jackass of a bully. I mean, the man greets his agent, “Hey fag.”
  • Kaila, 23-year-old movie-loving rasta barista, doesn’t want any of Chad because she’s on a mission: finally win over her childhood crush, Gabe, who dropped unmentioned (probably drug-related) charges against her – and she has a plan to get him.
  • Fred, Gabe’s sheriff brother, is pro-Bush and so naive. He’s not a good people-reader. Poor guy. But he is gung-hoe about his job – and seizes opportunities, albeit a little illegally.

Despite his womanizing ways, Chad is a “devout Republican and a big-time believer in the institution of monogamous heterosexual marriage.” He has no care for how his overt sexcapades can end up hurting hurting his Hollywood image (or is that his image?) let alone a ton of women, but he cares for the sanctity of marriage. Seriously? What a contradiction! Chad’s “moral grounding” doesn’t hold much water.

Stock has set up a good foil here: Chad and Gabe are opposites. Gabe is an intelligent war veteran-turned-attorney. He is respectable (both in part from his war tour and his current DA job) and due to his position, beyond moral reproach. Chad on the other hand, is a glutton bully with ravishing sexual habits. He’s the kind of douche who will hog the sidewalk and make a gimp war veteran step off the path and into a puddle. This strikes a special cord in me, as the men in my family have all given up of their bodies and abilities to serve our country in almost every branch. Needless to say, I don’t see much growth for Chad. And Gabe’s the kind of guy who will say his peace, yet again be shoehorned because he’ll be late for his DA appointments. But one too many times and… just keep on smirking asshole.

Chad is most definitely threatened by Gabe – he uses multisyllabic words! With Chad and Gabe’s feud over Kaila, Chad may have more monetary influence, but Gabe has more power and the upper hand. I’m not sure that he loves, let alone likes Kaila overmuch, but he’s placing her in the hot seat to pursue his vengeance of Chad the Bully. I’m sure I’ve seen that episode of Cold Case Files; cop frames ex-lover’s paramour and takes him down – and despite my propriety for right and justice…in that sick and twisted way that is human nature, I get it. I really do. It’s relatable – no matter the situation. Someone consistently abuses their powers (whether supposed like Chad’s, or real like Gabe’s) at the expense of others, and karma’s a bitch of a payback.

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Archangel Gabriel, c. 13th century, Anonymous

Unfortunately, unbeknownst to him, Gabe is caught in a love triangle…or square without one side – and it may just blow his case, which he claims is the “biggest criminal case of the 21st century,” and not just because his assistant wants to be “on Gabe faster than a coyote on a sack of cheeseburgers” to “fuck his drunk brains out.” Now, that made me laugh! But that quickly changed – and just as I predicted, Stock delivers a quite shocking twist, and then another when Gabe creates an imaginary friend, who just might ruin everything…

Despite what the book synopsis says, I was surprised because it’s not so much Gabe pushing for this revenge as it is Kaila…and although Gabe is dealing with some, er, personal issues, he has visits from his hero, past president Abe Lincoln, and a very unlikely series of conversation ensue. I couldn’t help but notice Gabe’s hero of choice, Abe, is juxtaposed next to Gabe’s name after a particularly pivotal point in the book…and makes me think Gabe means Guilty Abe. I also found it interesting that Stock used the name Gabriel for the main character. We all know Gabriel served as a messenger between God and humans in Biblical times. Is this another manifestation of Gabe’s ego?

The time setting of the book is finally revealed in Chapter 9, when Gabe starts recording information about the trial for his next book at his book agent’s request. Although it’s not made clear how much time has passed, it doesn’t seem more than a short few months. His first entry is dated September 2005 after the preliminary hearing, yet at the beginning of the book Bush had just been re-elected, which would have been November 2004. The timing isn’t fully revealed, but it does take a while to get a case to trial.

I think Stock’s personal sense of humor can be found through Gabe’s writing: he juxtaposes Gabe’s free-writing of a college English class and bad grammar with an incredibly long run-on sentence. As an English minor, I can see irony, humor and reality of it.

And the humor continues.

And just as it is always darkest before the dawn, it is always quietest in a courtroom before a witness answers a question about where his penis had been. 

Actually, he probably loved his kids more than Gabe, but they were four and six-years-old and didn’t seem like real people yet – more like talking pets. 

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Norton and Pitt in Fight Club

As I read further into the last few chapters through the thick and heavy, I had an epiphany. Gabe and his imaginary friend remind me starkly of Edward Norton’s role as The Narrator and Brad Pitt’s role as Tyler Durden in Fight Club. I did an extensive writing project on this movie for my freshman English class, so I’m very familiar with the movie. If you’re not, I encourage you to watch it – a few times – after you’ve read Gabe’s Plan to see the connection. I don’t want to give it away and ruin the movie, or the book, for readers, but the closing photo is a hint.

There’s no neat way to wrap up this novel at the time immediately after the trial, so it surprised me that there was an epilogue. After Fred revealed some of his knowledge to brother Gabe, I was sure the closing arguments of the trial would be the ending of the book – clear cut, yet ambiguous.  (I know, what a paradox.) The epilogue is set during right at Obama’s win over McCain in 2008, and Gabe has indeed become a great man. However, you’ll be surprised who he meets…and the outcome of a murder.

-CA

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The Kindle HD

Back in October, I wrote a post about the Kindle vs. Paper.  Click here to read that post.

I received my 7″ Kindle Fire HD for Christmas, thank you Daddy.

I have had two months to play with it, read on it, download books for it, so I figured it’s time to review.

Kindle Free Time -- for my daughter

Kindle Free Time — for my daughter

The first day I had my Kindle Fire HD, I was able to pick and choose which books I wanted from my archived book list to go into the carousel.  That is the running list of programs, apps and books that you can flip through with a flick of the finger.

I quickly downloaded FB, Pinterest, my bank’s app, and Skype.  I was able to Skype with my brother and grandparents in Pittsburgh on Christmas night.  That just blew my mind.  We could have been on a laptop, but the Kindle allowed me to set it up for my six year old who was showing off her loot from Santa.  The looks on the faces of my grandparents was worth the cost alone.

I occasionally have issues with FB loading, but I think that is an inherit flaw to the FB app.  But I have been able to use the Kindle like a laptop with the exception of typing, and like my Android phone.  It also uses the same “swype” keyboard that I’m used to with my Android.

The biggest change I have noticed with the Kindle Fire HD is that my daughter loves it.  I subscribe to “Kindle Free Time” which is a service that allows my daughter to read books, play games, watch videos, etc.  Its only a couple bucks a month, and it is well worth the cash.  The thing I really like about this feature is that it creates a separate user profile for her in which I can control what she has access to and how long she is playing on it.

Because she is six, I did not give her permission to the web.  At all.  There also is a separate code that needs to be typed in when she attempts to buy things online.  That soon proved to be a problem with her downloading apps without permission on my Dad’s iPad.  I can also buy books for her on Amazon and add those books to her carousel only, and I don’t have to wade through a ton of kiddie books to find what I need.

She loves it.  I mean, really loves it.  It took her no time at all to figure out how to get to the stuff she likes.  She occasionally complains about the screen time settings.  I have a 2 hour per day time limit on it, along with settings on how much time can be used on apps, and how much time can be spent on videos, reading is unlimited.

She blew my mind the other day when she figured out how to get the books to read TO her.  The words light up as they are read.  Although I like to read her books, this is just another way for her to hear the words and see the proper spellings.

My Kindle carousel

My Kindle carousel

For me, the best thing has honestly been that I can read in different fonts, colors and styles.  I no longer need a light for my Kindle because when it is in the “black” setting, the words are white and the background is black.  Not a lot of light is generated, and my husband isn’t complaining about my little LED light that I used to read at night with my older Kindle.

In addition, I can change the font size , just like on an older Kindle, but I can also change the text font.  This is of tremendous value to someone who has severe eye problems.

I have watched videos and Netflix and I have had no problems at all with buffering or it starting and stopping the video over and over again.

I have shopped on it, even for more than books, and again, no problems.

The only complaint, is that I have to charge it everyday.  I could go a week or so on my old Kindle without recharging.  But I understand that to be in full, glorious color, and to run the apps that it runs, it uses up a ton of battery.

Another issue is the fact that I can’t categorize my books.  I frequently “book hunt” and buy several books at a time, mostly self published and usually free.  On my previous model, I had several categories of books, and I would assign the new books by category so I would have a clue later on as to what I purchased.

With the Kindle Fire HD, everything is listed on the bookshelf, and they can be chosen from the “cloud” and downloaded to the device one book at a time, usually in less than a minute.  All of the books downloaded can show up in the carousel, and sometimes I have to wade through books to find one that I downloaded awhile ago, and want to read now.  I can remove the book from the carousel when I am done reading it, but with my reading habits, this isn’t really ideal.

I have also been able to put books not bought on Amazon on to my Kindle Fire HD, but it is a bit more tricky than with the old USB to device route.  I had difficulty downloading the Windows inputs needed to get it from the laptop to the Kindle Fire HD.  But I started emailing the books to my Kindle address, and they pop up, most of them are without the cover art, a few minutes later.

Because I read from Smashwords in addition to authors sending me books for review, I was glad to finally be able to figure this one out.

My Kindle now goes with me everywhere.  And even though I don’t always have internet access when I leave the house, I’m kind of glad it is not like an iPad that is tied to a data plan.  Probably saves me more money in the long run and my daughter is “forced” to read books when we aren’t home.

Overall, immensely pleased with my Kindle HD, just like I knew I would be.

Book Review: Poseidon’s Children by Michael West

Awesome cover art!

This is the latest book I have reviewed for “I read a book once”. Enjoy!

The cover art alone should warrant a good review for this book. The illustrations throughout the book help as well. But ultimately it was the “about” blurb that reeled me in (pun intended):

Man no longer worships the old gods; forgotten and forsaken, they have become nothing more than myth and legend. But all that is about to change. After the ruins of a vast, ancient civilization are discovered on the ocean floor, Coast Guard officers find a series of derelict ships drifting in the current–high-priced yachts and leaking fishing boats, all ransacked, splattered in blood, their crews missing and presumed dead.

And that’s just the beginning.

Vacationing artist Larry Neuhaus has just witnessed a gruesome shark attack, a young couple torn apart right before his eyes … at least, he thinks it was a shark. And when one of these victims turns out to be the only son of Roger Hays, the most powerful man in the country, things go from bad to worse. Now, to stop the carnage, Larry and his new-found friends must work together to unravel a mystery as old as time, and face an enemy as dark as the ocean depths.

The concept of this book is insanely imaginative. Drawing on extensive knowledge of the deep, Mr. West creates truly horrifying creatures that literally leap out of the pages. The illustrations help, but if the reader has ever seen a Discovery Channel special on the deep blue sea, then it will come in handy.
It starts like Jaws. There is something in the water. But luckily someone happened to witness the attack, and that starts the ball rolling.

The following chapters seem to introduce more and more characters in a riveting way. Many seemingly unassociated characters (marine archeologists, Coast Guard members, the Mafia) are fleshed out. As soon as the reader starts to get tired of the seemingly endless character introductions, they all begin to tie in together.

And the character development is excellent. All of the “unrelated characters” are so strongly developed so the reader will have a sense of confidence to where the plot is going toward the end of the book. The reader can literally see how one character will react with a given situation without any major unnecessary surprises.

The plot is worked out very well. No insane twists and turns, and despite the subject matter, it is actually believable.

I particularly loved the author’s description of the “transformation” that some of the characters go through.

And it is very well written. No lazy author here! The words are dramatic without being cliché. You do not get the sense that the author opened the thesaurus and started randomly picking descriptors.
Although, at least in my version, there seemed to be a few words cut off at the end of some sentences, especially when turning the page. I tried changing the size and the font (I have a Kindle HD) and this did not remedy the situation. I was still able to piece together the general gist of the sentence, however.

Overall it is a good and captivating read. I will definitely think twice before heading into any ocean. And I will NEVER swim at night.

WANTED: books of all genres

Wanted - Dead or Alive!

WANTED: Books for review. I am looking for any books to read and review to post on this site. I am currently in a book drought. I have started and stopped several books that failed to captivate me and keep me interested.

If you are a self published writer, a publisher, or just an avid reader like me, please send me ideas or books or something.

As per this site, I read almost anything. I do have rules that I try to abide by, you can read them here.  But if it doesn’t seem like something I will read, my guest blogger might.

I love books that I can completely immerse myself in. I love strong characters, believable action. I love books that can make me think. Feel free to read through the reviews I have posted so far to get an idea of what I am looking for.

I read very quickly and I have ample free time and I usually read 2-3 books a week. I am prompt with reviews and willing to post to any book sites (amazon, smashwords, goodreads etc).

I read on the kindle platform, as does my guest blogger.  Any input or ideas or books would be greatly appreciated.

You can email at the new address for this site: theeclecticbookworm@gmail.com

Thank you!!

AA

Book Review: Sharp Edges by Kristen Middleton

This book is the first foray by Kristen Middleton into the thriller/romantic genre.  I am a huge fan of her zombie books and vampire books.

In this book, Middleton tackles the subjects of child abuse, domestic violence, infidelity and the consequences therein.

Lindsey is a stay-at-home mom.  Her husband, Scott, prefers that she does not work out of the home, even though her kids are ‘tween age and above.  By accident, she discovers her husband is being unfaithful.  On their anniversary.  This development shakes her very foundation.  She suddenly questions everything:  her body, her self-worth.  She asks her husband to leave so they can figure out what is going to happen.

I like the new cover

Lindsey has a new neighbor, Jake, who is very good looking.  Lindsey and Jake become friends, and more, as the book progresses. Jake is a bit mysterious, and although he is in law enforcement, Lindsey understandably has issues with trust.

At the park one day, Lindsey meets a new neighbor.  Her suspicions are aroused when she notices the very pregnant neighbor and her child have ugly bruises.  Her involvement in this situation will have dire consequences.

Although I really enjoy the way the author writes, her sense of humor, her style, I felt that this book wasn’t very strong plot wise.  There is some confusion as to who is who (stemming from the prologue), and events seem unlikely.

Personally, I could identify with this book on many levels.  I appreciate the author’s choice to bring infidelity and domestic violence to the forefront.   The passages in which these topics are discussed are spot on and very powerful.  I truly understand Lindsey’s reluctance to trust men again, the notion of “who the hell did I marry?” (and I think there is a TV show with a title that is similar).

People who have had no experience with these topics can have a difficulty understanding them.  When you have been married to a person for a number of years, when you have had children with them, and they betray you, it is very hard to trust anyone. Ever.  The introspection, the critical eye that is now cast toward the self can be brutal:  “what is wrong with me?” “what does she have that I don’t have?” “how dare he (or she) do this to me after all these years”.  I feel this book can help those people who do not understand.

I also like the portrayal of friendship between Lindsey and her friend Darcy.  I feel that every woman should have close friends that are always there and are always fiercely supportive.

I also liked the relationship between Lindsey and her kids.  Adults often do not give children much credibility with understanding such situations.  But kids are resilient, and often know way more about a situation than they let on.

And I liked the way Lindsey and Scott handled the situation.  They didn’t disparage the other party, they didn’t play head games with the kids.  That happens far too often in society, and it is refreshing to see these types of situation portrayed in a positive light.

I do recommend this book for women (and men) who are fortunate to have led a life free of violence.  It is a wonderful tool for empathy.

And I always look forward to anything this author produces (I am waiting impatiently for the next installment of Blur and Zombie Games).

 

The Zombie Bible

I love my zombie stories. I have posted about this series before, but the last book was just so incredible, I had to make another post.  You can read about my past posts on this series here.

Stant Litore is an amazing writer. The way he constructs sentences and weaves them into paragraphs is a true art form. I always appreciate great writing, and these books are incredible.

Some background info: although I grew up Catholic, I know next to nothing about the Old Testement. I have no clue who these main characters in his books are, other than “oh, I might have heard that name before”. The books take the supposition that zombies have always existed. They are a fact of life from the beginning of time.

The protagonists in his books are usually some know Biblical figure. In the first one, its the prophet Jerimiah (although he uses the Hebrew spelling). In the second its Polycarp. And in the third, its Devorah (Deborah).

The characters literally leap off of the page. They are so real and so textured that you *KNOW* these characters. You understand their struggles, understand their emotions. The reader can also watch them evolve throughout the book, as they struggle against the walking dead.

I love the relationships discussed and expounded upon in the books. The relationship between Regina and Polycarp, between Devorah and Hurriya. Jerimiah and his wife. You can literally feel their emotions. Their love for each other.

I appreciate the strong female characters, what they have endured and who they are by the end of the book. How they accomplish the impossible. How they can still move on after witnessing such gore and having those close to them devoured.

And the reader is treated to a history lesson as well. The settings for these books are so real, you can almost feel the stones in the streets of Rome on your feet. You can feel the oppressive environment in which Jerimiah finds himself. You can literally feel the heft of Devorah’s sword.

And in each is a deeper meaning to hunger and the walking dead.

There are heart pounding elements of a thriller as well. Page turning passages that you cannot put down because you cannot bear the ignorance of not knowing. The passage with Regina being carried through the streets of Rome with zombies in pursuit is so well written, the reader can feel the terror that she experiences. Tachycardia inducing, hyperventilating, abject terror.

The zombies are of the variety of the common zombie. Due to some failure, they are doomed to walk the earth in search of flesh to feed their insatiable hunger. The zombie scourge sweeps through cities, villages and settlements, nearly decimating the population. It usually falls to the main characters, who occasionally have a special gift or talent, and who understands the zombie hoard, to rid the land of the walking dead.

I wholeheartedly recommend this series to any lover of novels. Even if you have a particular aversion to this genre, try these books because they are so well written, the stories so artfully told, they deserve a wide distribution.

I can credit these books with sparking an interest of ancient characters from the Bible. In the course of writing this post, I googled some of the characters. And I spent hours just reading about about the real people on whom the characters are loosely based. That spark alone is worth the extremely reasonable price of these books (right now I think the most expensive one is $3.99 for the kindle edition).

I know Stant Litore is writing more, because he occasionally posts passages from the emerging book on his facebook page (look up “The Zombie Bible”). I can’t wait to see further works in this series. However, if you are deeply religious, you may not like Biblical figures in battle with the walking dead. I think that Litore is planning on mentioning Jesus in an upcoming novel.

Give it a shot, see if you like it. I most definitely did.

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