The Divergent Series

divergent

Yes, I had to hop on this bandwagon too.

I love dystopian YA literature.  And I love books that turn into movies.  So its no wonder that I found this one.  And I did try to avoid it.  But one of my friends recommended it, and I was sucked in.  So here goes:

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is—she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles to determine who her friends really are—and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes infuriating boy fits into the life she’s chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she’s kept hidden from everyone because she’s been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her.

Debut author Veronica Roth bursts onto the literary scene with the first book in the Divergent series—dystopian thrillers filled with electrifying decisions, heartbreaking betrayals, stunning consequences, and unexpected romance.

I do not like the ending.  Period.  That is all I will say.

I do like the first book, and even the second, and most of the third.

The first fascinated me with the explanation of the factions, Choosing Day, the entire concept that you have to pick the entire rest of your life on one day.  I was fascinated with the idea that these people had no clue of their past, no clue of where they came from.  That question was answered later, but the logical, adult part of me was analyzing every aspect of it.  I had the same problem with The Hunger Games.  I guess if enough time goes by, and kids are indoctrinated into a certain way of thinking in schools, certain knowledge just goes away.  It makes me shudder to think that my child is educated in Texas public schools.

Outside of the dystopian aspect, it really is a true coming of age story.  Tris is figuring out who she is.  What she likes about herself, what she doesn’t like about herself.  What she chooses to accept from her upbringing, what she chooses to reject.  She is constantly challenging herself to do things she never thought possible.  And at such a young age!  At 16 I don’t think I could make the choices she continually makes.  I’m not sure if I know who I am at (nearly) age 32.

I love the aspect of the Dauntless, of facing your fears.  Of courage.  Not sure I could do it at any age.

The love story isn’t as developed as the one in the Hunger Games.  It seems that Four and Tris don’t actually get enough time to know each other before the shit starts hitting the fan.

It is a thriller, a page turner.  Something that I would have been totally immersed in about 15 years ago.  I may be able to cajole my husband into seeing it when it hits theaters in March.  Just because I love seeing what I’ve imagined in my head come to life.  And I’m a huge fan of Kate Winslet.  That’s the teenager in me (can you say “Titanic”?)

So if you are interested in this stuff, go ahead and read it.  I do think that The Hunger Games is better, but it does seem that the author of this series set out to NOT be the Hunger Games with the ending.  I hope I didn’t spoil it.

Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: