Giving Thanks

I am extremely thankful for the printed (or electronic) word.

I have been losing myself in books since I was 7 or 8 years old.  Good novels have taken me away to far away places, taught me about other people, other cultures, other time periods.  Because of books, I kill at Trivial Pursuit.

I am thankful for good authors, those who pour their dreams into print and  share them with the world.  They produce characters that stay with readers for a lifetime.  They spin intricate tales, paint vivid settings, they use the simple word to convey emotions and report on the human condition.  Regardless of genre, it isn’t easy to sit down and start writing something from nothing, and then to make it capture the imagination of readers.  I am truly thankful that they do.

I am thankful to the good people at amazon.com for inventing the kindle.  The e-reader has revolutionized the institution of publishing and writing and has enabled authors who might not have been able to have their voice heard in a traditional setting to share their work with the world.  Through the kindle, I can store hundreds of books in a slim device, which is paramount for someone with health issues and can no longer hold up huge, lumbering tomes.  I can access a library of works, many of them for free, without leaving my bed.

I am thankful for Dr. Seuss.  He started me on this journey, and I am eternally grateful.

I am thankful to the historical authors, Stephen Ambrose, James McPherson, David McCullough, who have found away to sift through tons of musty historical records and found a way to make history interesting.  They found a way to appeal to the masses and make battles and military campaigns read like movie scripts.  Because of them, and authors like them, Americans have more respect and reverence for their veterans.  They know what was sacrificed for their freedoms.

I am thankful for the voodoo culture and to George Romero, who have brought on the current zombie craze and have provided me with hours and hours of entertainment reading about the apocalypse and impending zombie uprising.

I am thankful for sites such as bookbloggers.net that allow me to read amazing books for free in exchange for a review.  I am extremely low on funds, can barely pay for my bills, yet I can keep up my reading habit by doing something I was probably going to do anyway.

I am thankful to those of you who read this blog.  I obviously love reading, and I love being able to share it with the world.  In a perfect existence, I would get paid to do this, but I haven’t found that perfection.  Yet.

Happy Thanksgiving y’all!!

 

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Kiddie Lit

Looks exciting!!

The first book I learned to read on my own was Fox in Sox by Dr. Seuss. I haven’t read it probably since that time. I vaguely remember that the world seemed to “turn on” once I learned how to read. Suddenly, every thing around me seemed to make more sense. I don’t know how to explain it in any more detail than that. It was like going from regular TV to HD. And I haven’t let up since.

More about my early reading experiences can be found on the About section.

My daughter is now of the “learning to read” age, and they are teaching it very differently in school. I never learned “sight words”. I don’t know if it was because I was in Catholic schools, but we did strictly phonics. My daughter is in public schools, and they are doing a combo of both, “sight words” and phonics. Either way, she is doing very well.

I remember having Rainbow Brite books on tape, and reading along with tape when I was a kid. Now it seems like kids have no end of electronic pens, iPad apps, etc to help them learn to read. I don’t know if it was a combo of school or us reading to her or her patching things together on her own, but she is learning to read quite rapidly.

Makes me think about the books I loved as a kid and the ones she loves right now.

I loved the Dr. Seuss books. I loved the way the words just rolled off my tongue. I loved the way it didn’t make sense, but then it did. Hop on Pop; Red Fish, Blue Fish; The Cat in the Hat; I loved the world of Dr. Seuss as a kid. My daughter has a few of those titles, hasn’t started to read them  herself yet, but she loves it when I read it fast and then sound silly. That’s my girl.

I loved the Bernstein Bear books. And Little Critter. I don’t have any for my daughter, but the Bernstein Bears are now a cartoon series on Sprout.  Oh, and Little Golden Books.  I loved those books.  Cheap, easy to read, but don’t hold up well over time.

I love the books by Jamie Lee Curtis for my daughter. We have When I Was Little..; It’s Hard to be Five; and my fav Big Words for Little People. I like the way they are written with humor and illustrated in a way that really sinks in for her.  Who thought a teen scream queen would turn into an awesome children’s author?

My daughter’s favorite book right this second is Silverlicious by Victoria Kann. She wants this one read to her 24/7. I’m trying to get her to read some of it on her own, and she is getting there. Maybe Santa will turn into a librarian this year.

I have no idea what other book series there are out there for little kids these days.  All of my friends have younger kids, and mostly boys.  I am hoping to acquire a Kindle Fire for Christmas so I can download free books for her as well.  Not that I can’t already do that on the Kindle I have, its just that its not in color and the gray scale really won’t cut it for her.

Any suggestions on first reading series for beginning little girl readers??

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